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20121015
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
know him? >> i knew him from the very beginning of my life at cbs, 1964. he was the executive producer of cbs evening news, the cronkite news, when i joined. shortly after he was fired, and was in a kind of limbo or siberia for a couple of years. i did a documentary for them in 1968. don was the nominal executive producer. so i have known him for a long time. when we came up with this idea of "60 minutes," he became a kind of willy loman. he put together a reel of all cbs reports using 10 or 15 minute segments, taking the best of each of them and putting together a reel he went shopping that around to every executive at cbs. he brought that to me, to others, trying to sell and get support for his idea of this thing he called "60 minutes." he had harry reasoner, the original host in, call this a pilot if you like. then he added mike wallace into the pilot. it was his relentless pursuit. they said, ok, we will do it. we will try. we will put you on at 6:00 on a sunday. so harry and i went on. later, harry left to go to abc and they brought me to be the other guy on "60 minutes." we were
>> this week on "q&a " 12-time emmy award-morley safer winning morley discusses his long career with cbs news and his 40 years as a correspondent on "60 minutes." >> morley safer -- how have you changed your approach to information over the last 42 years of "60 minutes." >> no dramatic difference in terms of reporting the news or doing interviews for the news or, really, even between doing what is construed as hard news versus feature stuff. the same rules apply. he tried to get to the core, the core of the individual. i think really that is why we have an audience. for the last 45 years on "60 minutes." i think it is precisely why people watch the broadcast. we have no or few access -- i do not think we do any at all. i think we are fair. this is the fairness that is the attraction, unlike some much of what you see on cable, where fairness is the last thing people are being offered. to a certain audience, the last thing they want. >> we have a video from your office -- we took a camera there. i want you to talk us through than what the environment is, how long you have been there. you can se
. again, they began at noon at"meet the press," nation" from cbs. listen to them all on c-span radio. nationwide on xm satellite radio. you can listen on their blackberry, android, or iphone or go online to cspanradio.org. >> on the sixth day after being an office, we were sitting in the oval office. larry summers said, mr. president, looking at this year 's budget, you will have $1 trillion deficit. he said, i have not done anything yet. >> we cannot keep looking our children in the i knowing that we are going to give them a diminished future. we are spending their money today. it is a very simple idea. mitt romney and i will bring it to washington. we have to stop spending money we do not have it. we must cut spending. we have to get a balanced budget. we must get the debt under control. >> paul ryan and joe biden will face off in their only debate. you can watch and engage with c- span with our live debate previous starting at 7:00 eastern followed by the debate at 9:00. your reaction, calls, e-mails, and tweets at 10:30. "washington journal" co
at osu. jim heath is a cbs affiliate television show host. tony is joining us from south carolina. caller: good morning. i want to say something. i generally vote republican, but i have voted for kennedy. i like romney, but i will vote for obama, because i want to see the democrats get what they deserve. the black people are voting for obama because he's black and that's fine. and they think he's going to be good for them. that's fine. but they talk about ron -- about romney lying. obama said that his father or grandfather fought in world war ii, which could not be right according to his age. but obama lies all the time. his birth certificate is a lie. why have we gone to the u.n. all the time to get this one world tin? i want th -- one world thing? read the rise and fall of the third reich and you will see this guy is paralleling everything that hitler did. a special army and so on. host: thanks for the call. i do want to clear up one thing. the president has not talked about his father, but his grandfather did serve in world war ii and his speech is available on our website, c- span.org
career with cbs news and his 40 years as a correspondent on "60 minutes." >> morley safer -- how have you changed your approach to information over the last 42 years of "60 minutes?" >> no dramatic difference in terms of reporting the news or doing interviews for the news or, really, even between doing what is construed as hard news versus feature stuff. the same rules apply. you try to get to the core, the core of the individual. i think really that is why we have an audience for the last 45 years on "60 minutes." i think it is precisely why people watch the broadcast. we have no or few access -- i do not think we do any at all. i think we are fair. it is the fairness that is the attraction, unlike some much of what you see on cable, where fairness is the last thing people are being offered. to a certain audience, the last thing they want. >> we have a video from your office -- we took a camera there. i want you to talk us through than what the environment is, how long you have been there. you can see it on the screen. >> that is the lobby. we have a huge clock, which nobody really likes
has been brought to you in part by aarp virginia, league of women voters of virginia, wtvr cbs 6 and pbs, community idea station. we want to say thanks again to the candidates for appearing together on the stage tonight. we heard a lot about social security, medicare. many of the issues voters of virginia are facing. we want to thank those voters and our live audience for taking part and wavening. don't forget, election day is now less than a month away. on behalf of everyone who brought this debate to you, i'm bill fitzgerald. good night. >> all this month and until election day, c-span is bringing you white house and senate debates around the country. on c-span television networks c-span radio and c-span.org. tomorrow we're in west virginia for the debate between democratic governor earl ray tomlin and republican challenger bill moloti. live coverage starts at 7:00 p.m. eastern. wednesday, we move to massachusetts for the third debate between republican senator scott brown and his democratic challenger, elizabeth warren at 7:00 eastern. and thursday the only debate between the
outlets abc, cbs, nbc, cnn, all planned to use split screens regularly. fox said it would even continue using it more than it did in the presidential debate. in denver, some of the candidates have tried in the past with limited success. using reaction shots of candidates. aides to bill clinton -- aides to bill clinton and president george bush in 1992 when as far to write into their debate contract that television networks could not broadcast such images. the campaigns of senator john kerry and president george w. bush -- the non-partisan organization that oversees the production, while the submission has final say over where those cameras are in place, they do not control the mechanics of filling camera angles or rigid of filming camera angles." that work is left solely to the discretion of the network pool producing the broadcast. last week it was abc, on thursday it was cnn." c-span was the first to start using split screens in 2000 when al gore was debating george w. bush, and the article in "the new york times" notes -- "the split screen has become such a modern media phenomenon, p
. we will continue to have this conversation going forward. [applause] >> c.b. only vice-presidential debate tomorrow night live on c- span, c-span radio, and online at c-span.org. watch and engage. business leaders discuss economic policies as a campaign issue in the 2012 election, this morning. president obama holds a campaign rally at ohio state university, followed by today's washington journal, live with your phone calls. >> our coverage of tomorrow night's debate begins at 7:00 eastern with the debate beginning at 9:00. here's a look back at the 1988 vice-presidential debate with senator dan quayle and senator lloyd bentsen. >> senator quayle, i don't mean to beat this drum until it has no more sound left in it, but the follow-up on brit hume's question when you said it was a hypothetical situation, it is, after all, the reason why we are here tonight, because you are running not just for vice- president. [cheers and applause] and if you cite the experience you had in congress, surely you must have some plan in mind about what you would do if it fell to you to becom
schieffer of "cbs news." thank you, senator mccain. thank you, senator obama. good night, everyone, from nashville. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [crowd murmurs] [crowd murmurs] [crowd murmurs] [crowd murmurs] [crowd murmurs] [crowd murmurs]
by my friend, bob schieffer of "cbs news." thank you, senator mccain. thank you, senator obama. good night, everyone, from nashville. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] there's no gladhanding like old gladhand
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)